Kategoriarkiv: Unspecified

Black Bottle

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland Unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is oaky and sweet. At first there’s a massive new oak layer sitting on top of a harsh grain spirit note. The oakiness feels prickly and has a piney smell to it. After a few seconds a middle layer starts to form with a vanilla and butterscotch sweetness. There’s also a whiff of peat somewhere within. There’s a fresh lemon fruitiness in the back but it’s easily mistaken for a metallic note. With time the sweet layer expands a bit which is much needed to balance out the oak. This is not the greatest nose, not even in the budget blend catergory.

Mouth: It starts out with the same prickly and piney oakiness creating a thick layer around the palate. On the inside all the other flavours fight for attention. There’s still a sweet vanilla/butterscotch note as well as a thin peatiness. There’s also a thin flowery note floating around on top and the lemon is still found in the back. The grain spirit is very subdued and the background consists of a nice gritty layer with a hint of rubber and sulfur.

Finish: The oakiness flares up to another level and becomes truly unpleasant at first. The peatiness can’t compete with the oak so it just becomes a background noise. The sweet layer and the floral note has disappeared and all that’s left is a dry woodshop oakiness with the pine notes still within. This is a bad whisky which is way over-oaked (on purpose probably) to create the illusion of a spicy and flavourful whisky to use in drinks and cocktails.

Additional information
This whisky is said to contain several islay and Speyside malts. The grain spirit part comes from the lowlands. Bunnahabhain is mentioned as the main islay malt in this blend.

Islay Mist

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland Unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is butterscotch and peat. At first there’s a whiff of peat sitting on top of a clingy butterscotch note. There’s a metallic vanilla attached to it. The peat is leaning towards a coastal character with seaweed and a pinch of salt. After some time a fruity layer comes though somewhere in between the peat and the butterscotch. It’s a generic fruitiness and can’t attached to a specific fruit. This is a decent nose for a cheap blend with the grain spirit toned down by the peat.

Mouth: It starts out with a surge of fruitiness with a quite peaty outside layer with medicinal iodine as well as burning hay. The fruitiness still feels generic, but it fits rather nicely together with the peat. After a few seconds the clingy butterscotch and the metallic vanilla comes through. It stays in the center and never really pushes forward which is a good thing. It becomes a bit ”chalky” as well. A bit of black pepper spicyness shows up for those who wait.

Finish: It takes a second or two before any flavour shows up. It starts from the outside with the peatiness and then the fruitiness. The metallic note is much clearer than before and when the butterscotch arrives it becomes a bit unpleasant. The oakiness comes late and when it does, it feels like it’s rescuing the last part of the finish. It’s not the most characterful oak, but it’s good enough. This is a decent blend which is slightly better than its peers.

Additional information
This whisky was originally made with whiskies from Laphroaig, GlenGrant and Glenlivet by Ian Hunter in the 1920’s. What goes into the whisky today is not revealed except that Laphroaig is in the mix.

The Naked Malt (Naked Grouse)

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Unspecified
Type: Blended Malt
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is sweet and fruity. At first there’s a thick layer of vanilla and dried fruits and berries. There are raisins as well as tropical fruits and lemons. There’s also cinnamon, a whiff of tobacco and a piece of sponge cake. Underneath, the distillate comes through as rather flat and uninteresting. There’s a metallic note coming through as well. It’s extremely top heavy and the sherry cask covers everything else. This is a nice enough nose, but it’s just a big fruity and sweet lid on top of a flat whisky.

Mouth: It starts out with the distillate peeking through with a surrounding sweet layer. It feels a bit young and spirity yet flat from the low ABV. The fruitiness is residing on the edges and stays there. It’s a fresher fruitiness than on the nose and reveals a larger portion of tropical fruits and lemon. The vanilla coats the palate together with a hint of the oakiness. The ripe notes can be found in the back but they are somewhat subdued. A slight spicyness will come for those with patience.

Finish: The sweetness carries over and are immidiately joined by a fresh oakiness and a hint of sulfur. The fruitiness is now once again leaning towards ripe and dried darker fruits. It doesn’t take long before the oakiness takes over and the late finish becomes very oaky and a bit clingy. There’s not much to it other than that. This is an ok whisky which is obviosly a cover-up. The (presumably) seasoned sherry cask is doing a good job, but in the end it just makes the whisky top heavy with a shallow bottom.

Additional information
This is the rebranding of The Naked Grouse. The malts used are not entirely specified but Macallan, Highland Park and Glenrothes are known. It’s finished in first-fill ex-Oloroso sherry casks.

Golden Shoe Blended Scotch Whisky

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland Unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is harsh, sweet and grain spirit heavy. A massive vanilla note dominantes together with what could be described as rubbing alcohol. The sweetness is just generic white sugar-like. There’s no fruitiness nor oak. There’s a hint of cardboard coming from behind. It’s one-dimensional and lacks both depth and complexity on the nose.

Mouth: It starts out very watery with just a touch of sweetness. The vanilla continously move forward and a tiny spicyness appears on the tip of the toungue. A bitterness builds up in the back. The grain spirit is very pronounced and ”boozy”. It’s not a very nice mouthfeel.

Finish: The harsh grain spirit flare up and soon gets replaced with vanilla once again. It quickly switches over to a very bitter and somewhat unpleasant oakiness. The oakiness stays for a pretty long finish, which in this case isn’t a good thing. This is a bad whisky and it should not be consumed neat.

Additional information
The Golden Shoe/Golden Goal whiskies are released as limited editions for soccer championships. The content is not disclosed, but it’s bottled by Schwarze & Schlichte Markenvertreib GmbH & Co. KG.

The Dundee 10 YO – Vintage Reserve

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is very sweet and slightly fruity. At first there’s a thick and heavy vanilla and butterscotch sweetness which covers everything else. When it settles a green apple fruitiness comes through together with the grain spirit. It’s very mild and round without any pointy bits. With time the butterscotch and vanilla shifts towards more of a toffee note and a hint of the oak shines through, otherwise it basically stays the same throughout the nosing. This is a decent nose but it’s not especially interesting.

Mouth: It starts out with a sweet layer of vanilla and toffee and a metallic and ethanol heavy background. The oakiness pushes through and it’s a bitter and not so pleasant oak. The toffee switches to a metallic butterscotch coming from the grain spirit. There’s also a hint of cinnamon floating around. The fruitiness is less noticable and it feels like there’s a very small variety of red fruits somewhere within. It’s still very mild and round but it doesn’t feel flat.

Finish: The impact is rather weak and uneventful. The metallic butterscotch note returns with the oakiness and a mild minty note. Everything else never really pops up and everything just crumbles and leaves the oakiness behind. It’s not a nice oakiness at all. It feels bitter and intrusive. This is not a good whisky, but it’s a bit better than the average cheap blend. It should be used in cocktails and not consumed neat.

Additional information
This is made by Angus Dundee Distillers. The content is not disclosed, but the company owns two single malt distilleries, which probably contributes to the taste. Those are Tomintoul and Glencadam. The grain whisky part comes from the Lowlands.

Ballantine’s Finest – Hard Fired

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is fruity and sharp. At first there’s a mix of red berries and green apples sitting on top of a very sharp and unpleasant distillate. Vanilla and butterscotch notes are sitting in the background. The heavily charred oak is coming through quite clear and the charcoal is very much a central part of the whole. With time in the glass the sharpness sudsides and it becomes mild and mellow. This is a decent nose for a cheap blend.

Mouth: It starts out with a big hit of butterscotch and vanilla with a lining of mixed fruits and charcoal. The sweetness is a bit unpleasant like aspartam and it’s mixed with a sweet liquorice note. There’s a nice mellow peppery note within and a not so nice bitterness. It’s sharp and metallic in the back and there’s a wet cardboard note as well. The charcoal slowly increases in intensity for those who are patient.

Finish: The transition is a bit flat and the vanilla, butterscotch and aspartam sweetness sort of just continue on. After a second or two there’s a brighter fruitiness arriving as top notes. The sharp ethanol layer is still making up most of the background together with a slightly bitter oakiness. The charcoal disappear fast as well as the fruitiness and it doesn’t take long for it to fall apart. All that’s left is a flat oakiness and some aspartam sweetness. This is not the best of whiskies but there are some decent casks involved and it lives up to its ”hard fired” claim.

Additional information
This blend was released in 2016. It’s aged in second fill american ex-bourbon barrels. The special thing about this is that the barrels are emptied, then ”hard fired” (recharred) and then the whisky is put back in the barrel for a finishing period. Also, it’s supposedly not the same blend as the original.

Stewart’s Finest Blended Whisky

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is sweet and thin. At first there’s a generic sweetness and a harsh grain spirit note. The oak is surprisingly detectable from the start. It’s a generic oakiness without any specific markers though. There is a thin layer of fruitiness with mainly orange peel coming through. After some time in the glass there’s butterscotch and vanilla arriving in the center. Everything seems to be decently balanced and it’s doing a good job of keeping the bad elements in check. This is not a great nose, but it’s not too offensive.

Mouth: It starts out very bitter in the back and with butterscotch and a generic sweetness up front. The harsh notes reside somewhere in the middle. There’s a metallic note in the back and a sprinkle of black pepper on top. The bitterness keeps on pushing forward to the point where it becomes unpleasant. The oakiness is still detectable within the bitterness but it is not doing anything to help out.

Finish: There’s not much of a change in the transition to the finish. It’s sweet up front and very bitter and metallic in the back. The fruitiness shines through for a moment but disappears just as quick. It doesn’t take long for everything to die down except the oak and the metallic note. This is not a good whisky and it feels and tastes cheap. The nose is the best part and it should not be consumed neat.

Additional information
The Stewart’s brand is owned by Whyte & MacKay and is blended by Richard Patterson. The ingredients aren’t disclosed.

Peter Dawson Special

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is sweet and metallic. At first there’s a big cloud of harsh grain spirit with a sharp metallic note in the center. An artificial butterscotch sweetness is starting out in the back, but moves forward with time in the glass. When the harshness settles a liquorice note starts to make itself known somewhere in the middle. There are also notes of heather and cardboard floating around. With some imagination one could find a hint of ripe red apples too. This is not an especially nice nose with a heavy lean towards the cheap grain whisky part.

Mouth: It starts out surprisingly spicy and sweet, but beneath lies a thin watery core. A heather and honey note sits on top together with the same artificial butterscotch found on the nose. There’s a hefty bitterness in the background and it’s not a nice one. There’s a thin anise note in there too. It’s not as sharp and metallic as on the nose, but it’s just as bad. With time the butterscotch becomes more pronounced and takes over.

Finish: The finish starts out with a second or two without any flavours coming through. When it picks up speed it’s the bitterness intertwined with an oakiness that completely takes over. A thin hint of the butterscotch do stay as a top layer, but the not so pleasant bitterness is very pronounced throughout the finish. The oak is somewhat dry and it’s like grey old oak planks. When everything fades, the metallic note returns and stays in the mouth for a long time. This is a cheap blend and it matches the pretences. This should not be served as a neat drink.

Additional information
This blend was first created in 1890 by Peter Dawson. It’s been connected in the past to Auchnagie, Convalmore, Towiemore and Balmenach. Today it’s owned by Diageo and the current content of this blend isn’t disclosed.

Bell’s 8 YO – Extra Special

ABV: 43 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is sweet and harsh. A big bucket of butterscotch together with the harshness from the grain spirit is first to come through. There are some assorted fresh fruits in the background as well as some vanilla and some sweet liquorice. This is a middle of the road blended scotch nose. The age hides most of the sharp edges though.

Mouth: It starts out pretty well rounded but the harsh grain note is still shining through from the background. The focus still lies on a very pronounced butterscotch with vanilla and a touch of honey. The fruit notes are still coming through, but they are still not recognizable as individual parts. The oak starts to make it’s presense known and it just adds a slightly unpleasant bitterness.

Finish: A small but noticable spicyness comes through together with the butterscotch and vanilla. There’s a bitterness from the start and it turns into oak and a bad cup of coffee. The assorted fruits stay through the finish. This is a standard blend with the sharp edges removed by age.

Additional information
This blend is made from up to 40 different whiskies. Blair Athol, Dufftown, Glenkinchie, Caol Ila and Inchgower are identified as parts of the whole. The extra special had the 8 yo age statement between 1994-2008.

Cluny Blended Scotch Whisky

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is harsh and slightly unpleasant. It starts out with a very heavy and rough dose of the grain spirit. When it settles it turns over to malt and a feint butterscotch character. It’s also got a metallic smell to it. It’s basically one-dimensional and doesn’t produce any other detectable aromas. This is a bad nose.

Mouth: It starts out very sweet and mild with the slightly bitter and artificial butterscotch note up front. It still leans heavily towards the unpleasant grain spirit. There is a slight hint of dried out grey oak planks in the background.

Finish: An immidiate drop in flavour makes everything just disappear. All that’s left is the dry and bitter oakiness and a taste of the ethanol. This is not a good whisky and it shouldn’t be consumed neat. The entire thing is a bit muted and the whole is not very protruding, which makes it a good choice for mixing; If hiding the whisky flavours is the goal.

Additional information
The Cluny brand is owned by Whyte & McKay. It’s supposed to contain up to 30 different malt and grain whiskies from Scotland.

Cutty Sark Original

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is fruity and ethanol driven. At first there’s a cloud of ethanol coming from the grain spirit together with mild vanillin and some fresh fruits. There’s sweet honey and just a hint of a floral note coming through, as well as some seaweed. The nose is quite monotone and not that interesting, but it’s alright for a cheap blend.

Mouth: It starts out a bit watery but soon there’s a nice fruity and malty core. There’s a grain spirit note surrounding the core and it’s somewhat metallic, but it’s not overpowering and doesn’t really make it taste too bad. There’s a nutty oakiness on the edges and a slightly bitter note somewhere on the inside. The core produces ripe red apples, vanilla and a hint of sweet liquorice.

Finish: It starts out surprisingly malty and the fruitiness and sweetness are intact with honey and ripe apples. The grain spirit slowly builds up and when it’s on the top of the curve it’s somewhat unpleasant, but still not too bad. The oak comes through once again and it’s still a nice, nutty oakiness. The sweet liquorice lingers in the mouth in the late finish. It feels slightly better than the standard cheap blend.

Additional information
This blend has been around since 1923 and is owned by Berry Brothers & Rudd. The content isn’t disclosed but the base is said to be whisky from The Glenrothes Distillery.

Lauder’s Finest Scotch Whisky

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 2
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is a big bucket of butterscotch. Behind that massive wall there are notes of vanilla and a layer of harsh grain spirit. There’s a metallic note in the back together with a small hint of salted peanuts. It’s very mild and easy on the nose.

Mouth: Very mild start, again with the massive butterscotch and vanilla flavours. There’s an aspartam sweetness and a bitterness both sitting in the back. There’s still a metallic layer coating the mouth and notes of the harsh grain spirit is still coming through the pretty butterscotch. This is very one-dimensional.

Finish: The Butterscotch and vanilla dominates from the start, but they are soon replaced by a dry, very bitter oakiness. It’s not a very pleasant oakiness and the bitterness clashes with the remaining butterscotch note. The metallic layer is still coating the mouth long after everything else disappeared. This is drinkable neat but should be used as a mixer.

Additional information
The Lauder’s brand was created in 1836 and the origin of this blend goes back as far as 1815. The only information about the content is that it’s made from a blend of Highland, Lowland and Speyside whiskies.

The Latitude 55 Degrees

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is badly aged grainspirit and butterscotch. At first, there’s a piercing metallic sweetness and a hint of vanilla. After a few seconds it switches towards butterscotch. With some Imagination, there are some coastal notes in the background with seaweed and ocean air, but overall this is just unpleasant.

Mouth: It starts out flat and sweet and after a while the butterscotch builds up and takes over. The unpleasant grain spirit notes are still in there, but they have taken a step back. There’s no coastal notes here at all but there is a hint of the oak coming through. There is a small glimmer of ripe fruits in the background, but it’s in no way helping this along. This is one-dimensional, and it’s not a good dimension.

Finish: It starts out with the metallic note up front and once again the butterscotch note comes out thick and pertruding. The oakiness is a bit late, but when it comes it’s actually not that bad. It’s got a nutty side to it, close to walnuts. This is not a whisky to be used as a neat pour. This should only be used as a mixer.

Additional information
Produced for the swedish market and blended by a swedish blender, Folke Anderson, known for making Grönstedts cognac. According to the official representatives it contains some islay malt and a lot of the content is sherry matured.

Grant`s Family Reserve

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is grainy and sweet. At first there’s a thick layer of badly aged grain spirit and an aspartame sweetness. There’s also a black liquorice note and just a tiny hint of heather, and, with some imagination, a hint of fruits. With time in the glass vanilla starts to come forward. This helps it along a little, but it’s basically just very unpleasant and sharp.

Mouth: It starts out very watery and after a second or two the grain spirit start to come through which isn’t a good thing. It comes with some vanilla, liquorice and honey notes, but mostly with a not-so-good bitterness. There is still a tiny hint of fruits and heather, but it’s buried deep within the unpleasantries.

Finish: A small surge of vanilla sweetness pass by on the way to a very flat and boring oakiness. The vanilla hangs on, but it’s just creating a thin veil above the bitter oak. The finish is rather short which in this case is a good thing. This is one of the worst scotch blends I’ve ever tasted and should not be had neat, nor be used as a mixer. In fact, it should only be used as a last resort kind of drink.

Additional information
The Family Reserve contains a lot of different whiskies and is based on single grain whisky from Girvan. It is aged in virgin oak, american ex-bourbon oak, and refill american ex-bourbon oak barrels. It’s made by William Grant & Sons.

Queen Margot 3 YO

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is butterscotch and liquorice. The first thing to come through is a rather unpleasant cloud of badly aged grain spirit. When the nose gets used to it the butterscotch and liquorice start to shine through. There are notes of overripe fruits and honey too. All the notes feel artificial and overshadowed by the grain spirit.

Mouth: It starts out with the same butterscotch and badly aged grain spirit as on the nose. It takes a while for the liquorice to penetrate the other flavours. There is a vague sign of sherry casks being in the mix, but they are just contributing to the butterscotch and not a fruitiness. It’s quite bitter and not in a good way. It doesn’t promote swallowing.

Finish: The artificial butterscotch and the grain spirit still dominate. It soon switches over to a bland and bitter oakiness. The finish is not too long, which is a good thing. This should only be used as a mixer and not consumed neat. Kudos for the bold age statement though.

Additional information
This blend is bottled by Wallace & Young Distillers Co. and the content is not disclosed. It’s sold by the supermarket chain Lidl.

King Robert II

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is very metallic with an unpleasant butterscotch up front. There’s a very harsh grain spirit coming through and the young distillate is very cardboardy. There’s a very unpleasant smell of a public urinal in the background. There’s some vanilla in the mix making it slightly more bearable. A strange note of burnt plywood appear with time in the glass.

Mouth: Still very metallic. The butterscotch is accompanied by toffee, vanilla and a tiny spice note. It’s flat in taste and the butterscotch is clinging to the mouth. There’s a bitterness coming through but it seems not to be connected to any specific flavour. With some imagination there’s a lemon note to be found in the back. It’s not as unpleasant in the taste as on the nose. There’s no oak notes present yet.

Finish: It starts out kind of bland and watery. The Butterscotch is still clinging to the mouth. There’s a tiny oak note finally appearing, but it’s flat and the entire thing sort of crumbles like a house of cards. In the end there’s just the metallic note left. This should not be consumed neat or on the rocks. I would use it as a mixer only.

Additional information
The brand was created in 1968 and it’s a blend made by Ian MacLeod Distillers. It’s stated that this blend uses older malts to give it a robust taste, but it’s not stated how old and which ones.

The Talisman

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is sweet malt and butterscotch. At first there’s a heavy layer of grain spirit with a base of vanilla and butterscotch. There’s a feint hay note in the background. With time in the glass a sweet maltiness builds up. There’s an unpleasant note somewhere in the middle which seem to come from within the grain spirit. It also seems like there are ex-sherry casks in the mix because there are overripe berry notes buried deep within. This is an overly sweet nose.

Mouth: It starts out sweet and it sort of prickles the toungue. The butterscotch comes marching in and it is accompanied with the maltiness and the unpleasant grain spirit note. The small hay note sits around the edges and it’s now clear that it’s coming from peat. This outer layer works itself inwards and actually makes it an okay experience after a while. The oakiness do come through here, but it’s quite anonomous and uninteresting with a bland bitterness to it.

Finish: Vanilla and just a feint hint of raisins pass by before it becomes a fight between the unpleasant grain spirit and the bland, bitter oakiness. All the flavours die down quickly and all that’s left is a mild cloud of ethanol and a hint of butterscotch. The peaty hay note return in the late finish as a thin outer layer. The finish is by far worst part of an otherwise decent put together cheap blend.

Additional information
The Talisman is made by J&W Hardie, which is owned by Tomatin. It contains 25 malt whiskies that make up 40 % of the blend. The other 60 % consists of 4 grain whiskies. 1 % of the blend is an unnamed islay malt. The youngest component is 5 YO.

For Peat’s Sake

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 1
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is very vanilla heavy with an artificial butterscotch note attached to it. There’s a wet peatiness surrounding everything, which kind of masks the unpleasant harsh young grain spirit notes. There’s still a cardboardy smell coming through though. There’s a lack of depth and it’s not promoting a wider search for things within.

Mouth: It’s just watery and bland. The main focus is still on the vanilla and an unpleasant sweetness is now added. The butterscotch is still there. A small fruit note briefly passes by and the peaty touch is there, but more subtle than on the nose. After a few sips the peatiness is nowhere to be found. There’s also a metallic note coming through.

Finish: There’s an increase of the already heavy vanilla from the start and a slight spicyness shows up. The whole thing then basically collapses leaving just a tanniny oak and some scattered peat notes. The butterscotch reappears and clings to the mouth and together with a metallic note makes the finish rather unpleasant.

Additional information
This is made by Angus Dundee Distillers. They tell a story about a maltman nicknamed Mr. Peat, who shuffled way too much peat into the Kiln, and thus created a heavily peated whisky. The content is not disclosed, but the company owns two single malt distilleries, which probably contributes to the taste. Those are Tomintoul and Glencadam.

Bell’s Blended Scotch Whisky

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 0
Impression: 2/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This Is sweet and unpleasant. A mix of harsh grain spirit and menthol fight with butterscotch and vanilla for the attention. A hint of baked red apples and pie crust come through after some time in the glass, but it remains one-dimensional and shallow.

Mouth: Watery at first then the overly sweet butterscotch note comes marching in. There’s a hint of fruitiness behind the unpleasant harshness. A tanniny oakiness slowly builds up. It’s very bitter, but not in a good way. The vanilla notes is kind of surrounding everything in a thin outer layer.

Finish: Everything except the oak and the harshness dies quite quickly and things just end in an unpleasant oakiness. There are traces left of butterscotch and vanilla, but they just kind of make the bitterness worse. There are hints of good things within, but they are well hidden.

Additional information
Bell’s consists of malts from the islands as well as speyside. Blair Athol, Dufftown, Glenkinchie, Caol Ila and Inchgower are identified as parts of the whole.

High Commissioner

ABV: 40 %
Origin: Scotland unspecified
Type: Blended
Bottles in collection: 0
Emptied bottles: 4
Impression: 1/5

Tasting notes
Nose: This is overly sweet and metallic. The first thing to hit the nose is the grain spirit. After that, it’s butterscotch with a sharp metallic smell to it. Around the edges there’s a hint of peat and a fruity and floral layer sits just inside. It’s hard to pinpoint, but there is a thin note of clementines. In the background there is a wall of cardboard shining through. This is somewhat unpleasant on the nose.

Mouth: It starts out with a sharp bittness and a huge chunk of butterscotch. The peat is still sitting in an outer layer, but it’s not as noticable as on the nose. The fruity and floral notes are still detectable, but they are further back. With time there’s a honey/vanilla note emerging. It still very metallic and the grain spirit is dominating.

Finish: At first there’s just the taste of young grain spirit together with the butterscotch clining to the mouth. After a second or two, the oak takes over. It’s grey oak planks with a speck of dust on them. A hint of hazelnuts can be found with some imagination. It’s still very metallic and there’s also a hint of bitter lemon shining through. The peat is not present at all in the finish. This tastes like the cheap blend it is.

Additional information
The High Commissioner brand is owned by the Loch Lomond group. The content of this blended whisky is not disclosed.